• HL Law Group

Keeping Your Home Your Haven Before and After a Hurricane

Holding fast to expert predictions, this year’s hurricane season is growing not only in the number of named storms, but also in the number of unprecedented weather events. Benchmarks in the past week include the Marco and Laura simultaneous threat with Hurricane Laura intensifying faster in 24 hours than any August Atlantic storm since Irma in 2017.



A major Category 4 hurricane when it hit Louisiana on August 27, according to Colorado State University (CSU) research scientist Philip Klotzbach, Laura also generated more Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) than all of the other August Atlantic named storms (so far) combined – Isaias, Josephine, Kyle and Marco. ACE is an integrated metric accounting for intensity and duration of storms.


With three months remaining in the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season, Florida residents should continue pre-storm preparations, readying not only for personal safety, but also taking the appropriate steps to avoid or minimize hurricane damage to the home such as:

  • Pruning tree limbs away from the home and removing dead trees and branches from the property.

  • Securing loose items, such as patio furniture.

  • Protecting windows and doors with impact-resistant glass or shutters.

  • Ensuring the garage door is in good condition and won’t give way during high winds. Brace the door if it is not stable. Winds that enter a garage can ultimately cause roof damage.

  • Securing loose rain gutters and downspouts and clearing clogged areas.

  • Purchasing a portable generator for use during power outages. Keep generators and other alternate power/heat sources outside at least 20 feet away from windows and doors and protected from moisture. Never try to power the house wiring by plugging a generator into a wall outlet.

  • Keeping the basement or crawl space dry with a sump pump or other drainage system.

  • Considering building a FEMA safe room or ICC 500 storm shelter designed for protection from high winds and in locations above flooding levels.


Guarding the Roof Over Your Head


To prevent or minimize these issues, have your roof inspected by a professional. A good roofing contractor should inspect the membrane, making sure there are no rips, punctures, holes or effects of aging. Also on the checklist should be inspecting flashings to ensure they are correctly attached and sealed. Mounted equipment should be examined, confirming the penetrations are properly sealed and that the equipment is securely attached. Additionally, gutters, drains, and downspouts should be inspected to ensure they are correctly attached and flowing to the proper location.



Living in a hurricane-prone area requires extra attention to the home, particularly the roof. It’s recommended that Florida homeowners have a yearly roof inspection to catch problems in their early stage. In addition to wind damage that can result in items being thrown on the roof, high hurricane winds can cause mounted hardware to be ripped off along with entire sections of the roof, leaving your home vulnerable to water damage.










Living in a hurricane-prone area requires extra attention to the home, particularly the roof. It’s recommended that Florida homeowners have a yearly roof inspection to catch problems in their early stage. In addition to wind damage that can result in items being thrown on the roof, high hurricane winds can cause mounted hardware to be ripped off along with entire sections of the roof, leaving your home vulnerable to water damage.









Feeling Confident about Your Post-Hurricane Homecoming



Should your home suffer the effects of a hurricane, follow these tips from Ready.gov on safely returning home after a hurricane:


  • Listen to local officials for information and special instructions.

  • Be careful during clean-up. Wear protective clothing and work with someone else.

  • Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. If it is safe to do so, turn off electricity at the main breaker or fuse box to prevent electric shock.

  • Avoid wading in flood water, which can contain dangerous debris. Underground or downed power lines can also electrically charge the water.

  • Save phone calls for emergencies. Phone systems are often down or busy after a disaster. Use text messages or social media to communicate with family and friends.

  • Document any property damage with photographs. Contact your insurance company for assistance.


If you need assistance with understanding your insurance policy, HL Law Group can help. Our team of 10 attorneys and 40 staff members are dedicated to serving you as your professional property claim resource.



HL Law Group is a boutique law firm that focuses its practice on property damage insurance claims. Call (855) 713-1212 or email us at info@hllawgroup.com if you have a question or a potential claim.

1 view

© 2019 by HL Law Group, P.A.

All Rights Reserved